The Effect of Music on Kids

Friday, May 20, 2011
by

LEARNING TO PLAY classical music can transform a child’s life, and you can witness it over the next two weeks.

On May 24, 41 “Kidzymphony” students and faculty will perform at 10:00 A.M. at Sanders Clyde Elementary/Middle School at 805 Morrison Drive. And on May 28, during Piccolo Spoleto, they will perform with the Youth Orchestra of the Lowcountry at 4:00 P.M. at Burke High School.

Two years ago, the Charleston Academy of Music (CAM) started the Kidzymphony Orchestra Program which it modeled after Venezuela’s El Sistema, a program that was founded with the belief that poor Venezuelan children should have access to classical music. That program began with 11 children in 1975 and has gone on to become one of the strongest vehicles for social change in Venezuela.

CAM’s Kidzymphony Program began with 21 kindergarteners and now, in its second year, consists of 41 kindergarteners and first graders who comprise two orchestras. The kids meet every day after school to learn to play the violin, viola, or cello. Their activities include group classes, orchestra rehearsals, basic skills/theory, and guest performances. In 2011-2012 the program will expand to include 23 new kindergarteners.

Since its inception, Kidzymphony has shown the positive effects that music has on the lives of the children and families. The program teaches important characteristics such as discipline, focus, self-confidence, and teamwork—all of which are reaffirming CAM’s belief that music can transform the lives of students, their families, and the community. Come see for yourself.

For information, contact the CAM office at (843) 805-7794 or cam746@yahoo.com.

Learn more at Charleston Academy of Music.

Kidzymphony is funded solely by private donations and foundations.

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Art by Olivia Ingle

Professional Russian tutor in Charleston SC

It is with life as it is with art: the deeper one penetrates, the broader the view.                   
~ Johann Goethe