Art

Church Gates of Charleston

Sunday, September 17, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Church Gates of Charleston

A LARGE PART of Charleston’s charm is its endless array of vignettes, each unique, yet each nestled in a harmony of textures, colors, and styles which offer more beauty in close proximity than perhaps any American city. In historic downtown you can stand almost anywhere, turn in a circle, and see something exquisite at... Read »

Miss Smith’s Spectacular Watercolors

Saturday, August 12, 2017
by ChasToday
Miss Smith’s Spectacular Watercolors

ALICE SMITH was an artist who saw a scene she liked and painted it. Simple as that. Yet, behind her simplicity looms a charm of ethereal beauty that renders her work as elusive as the artist herself. Of course, living during the emergence of impressionism and having a predilection for watercolor helped: the former... Read »

Vanderbilt Tradition Still Beckons at Biltmore

Friday, July 21, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Vanderbilt Tradition Still Beckons at Biltmore

THE LIST OF THINGS TO SEE and do at Biltmore House and Gardens is extensive, and all of it worthwhile. Combining magnificent architecture, glorious landscapes, and worldly seclusion, there is nothing quite like it on the east coast, perhaps in the country. Which also means that it’s not a matter of whether you should... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Corn Snake

Saturday, July 15, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Corn Snake

THIS IS A BEAUTIFUL SNAKE. It is so colorful and bright and well painted that you almost forget it’s a snake. Almost. One thing that makes you not forget is its characteristic way of moving in a series of long, muscular loops, which Catesby has captured perfectly. There is something particular about how snakes... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Wild Pine and Locusta Caroliniana

Friday, July 14, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Wild Pine and Locusta Caroliniana

A LARGE PART of Mark Catesby’s appeal is how his watercolors reveal and revel in the majesty of Nature. This is especially true of his paintings of flora which are typically brimming with life and movement. This simple rendering of a wild pine also shows how much Catesby was fascinated with the structural engineering... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Chatterer and the Magnolia

Thursday, July 13, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Chatterer and the Magnolia

THE CHATTERER, with its dynamic mask and bristly tuft of hair, is front and center in this composition, but the Magnolia steals the show. It’s one of the few instances (in this exhibit) where Catesby combined fauna and flora and shined the brightest light on the latter. Despite the bird being beautifully painted in... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Parrot of Carolina

Monday, June 26, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Parrot of Carolina

CATESBY OBVIOUSLY had a fond admiration for this “Small Parrot” of Carolina, which may be why this watercolor wins the prize for best combination of most beautiful and most pleasing to look at in this exhibit. But, why is it so satisfying? Why does it immediately make you happy? With Catesby, of course, there’s always... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Red Bird

Monday, June 26, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | The Red Bird

MANY PIECES in this exhibit jump out and impress you with their color, drama, and power. This one invites you in, and the more you linger the more there is to appreciate. The main thing, of course, is the bird whose painterly fluorescence simply cannot be captured in a reproduction. You have to view... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | Ivory-billed woodpecker

Sunday, June 25, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes | Ivory-billed woodpecker

THIS GORGEOUS PORTRAIT of an ivory-billed woodpecker (now on display at the Gibbes) is one of the most compelling pieces in this exhibit. One reason for that may be because it is equally powerful and perplexing. Its power derives partly from the bird’s size, which dominates the full height and nearly half the width... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — the Black Snake

Monday, June 19, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — the Black Snake

THIS WATERCOLOR stands out in several ways. One way is how Catesby has the snake itself “standing” out, as though it has lifted one quarter of its body into the air—which I have never seen a black snake do in quite this manner. It could be that this was Catesby’s way of bringing to life... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — The Little Thrush and the Dahoon Holly

Sunday, June 11, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — The Little Thrush and the Dahoon Holly

ONE OF THE FINEST PAIRS worth examining in this exhibition is the watercolor sketch and later etching of “The Little Thrush and the Dahoon Holly.” Together they demonstrate how Catesby observed, what his intentions seem to have been, and how he adjusted his art and science to complement each other. Sometimes an artist’s initial sketch captures... Read »

“Monchichi” is a Modern Dance Marvel

Saturday, May 27, 2017
by Peter Ingle
“Monchichi” is a Modern Dance Marvel

HONJI WANG AND SÉBASTIEN RAMIREZ bring new meaning to the expression, “body language.” In what can only be described as phenomenal, their dancing in “Monchichi” explores the full range and minutest intricacies of physical movement through a combination of strength, agility, grace, and acrobatic ingenuity. At times, they verge on a new language of “movement... Read »

Spoleto’s Eugene Onegin: the Forest and the Trees

Saturday, May 27, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Spoleto’s Eugene Onegin: the Forest and the Trees

THE TREES STOLE THE SHOW. Innovative and stunning in their own right (worthy of a modern art gallery), they dwarfed the singers, restricted the stage to one quarter of its depth, and distracted from the performance. The otherwise stark set had a warehouse look and industrial feel that modern designers prefer but which leave... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — the Bald Eagle

Saturday, May 27, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — the Bald Eagle

THIS BOLD IMAGE of an eagle is easy to overlook because it’s right at the entrance of the exhibit where there are several other strong pieces nearby. As you first step into the room, you may even find yourself spinning around trying to decide where to start. This watercolor also hangs next to its... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — The Blue Jay and the Bay-Leaved Smilax

Friday, May 26, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — The Blue Jay and the Bay-Leaved Smilax

THE BLUE JAY is a bothersome bird. It’s noisy and aggressive, and even known to rob eggs from other birds’ nests. And once again, Catesby has beautifully captured not just the species but its personality. In this watercolor, he portrays the jay leaning down, pressing forward, and screeching, with its furry crown tossed back, its tongue extended, and... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — The Porgy

Thursday, May 25, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — The Porgy

I DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU, but I usually find it hard looking at pictures of fish. The one on top here had also received a lot of press during promotion for the Gibbes exhibit, so I thought I had had enough of it. As I prowled the paintings, I could feel my reluctance to give it much time.... Read »

Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — the Ghost Crab and a Spider

Wednesday, May 24, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at the Gibbes — the Ghost Crab and a Spider

THIS DOUBLE STUDY of a crab and spider holds more than double fascination. It shows how Catesby observed as a scientist and how he worked as an artist. It also demonstrates two distinct approaches to watercolor design. And it beautifully compares two creatures with juxtaposing views of one from the front and one from above. Something... Read »

Mark Catesby at The Gibbes — The Little Owl

Monday, May 22, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Mark Catesby at The Gibbes — The Little Owl

NO KNOWN PORTRAITS of English naturalist Mark Catesby (1682–1749) exist, but if you look carefully you’ll see him in each of the watercolors and etchings now on exhibit at the Gibbes. If a portrait of Catesby is ever found, I also suspect it will resemble this exquisite rendering of an owl—which you may find watching you as you... Read »

The State of Art Today

Friday, May 19, 2017
by Peter Ingle
The State of Art Today

THE QUESTIONS “what is art, what is art really worth, and what does beauty have to do with art?” are getting renewed attention with the announcement about the sale of this painting by Jean-Michael Basquait. Whether you agree or not with the basis and conclusions of this critique in The Guardian, try giving this painting a long look. It is astonishing in many ways,... Read »

STEM versus the Arts — YES

Sunday, April 30, 2017
by Peter Ingle
STEM versus the Arts — YES

As published in The Post & Courier March 28, 2017 MUCH IS MADE ABOUT science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and for good reason. Throughout history their ingenuity has propelled us to continuous new heights. Think nuclear power, computers, the internet, and smartphones. Before those came the internal combustion engine, the telephone, radio, TV,... Read »

Mark Your Calendar for This Catesby Exhibit

Tuesday, March 14, 2017
by ChasToday
Mark Your Calendar for This Catesby Exhibit

THE GIBBES MUSEUM OF ART will present a special exhibition of works by Mark Catesby titled Artist, Scientist, Explorer: Mark Catesby in the Carolinas. The exhibition will run from May 12 – September 24 and will feature 44 watercolors by English artist, scientist, and explorer Mark Catesby, generously lent by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II from the British Royal Collection.... Read »

A New Play About Freedom — Starts Oct. 8

Thursday, October 1, 2015
by ChasToday
A New Play About Freedom — Starts Oct. 8

“RADICAL SON” is a new one-act, adventure-romance about Charlestonian John Laurens, an unlikely anti-slavery hero of the American Revolution. Co-authored by Clarence Felder and Chris Weatherhead of Actors’ Theatre of South Carolina, the play explores John’s relationship with his father, his British wife, his secretly freed manservant, and abolitionist poet Thomas Day. It runs... Read »

The Soul of Charleston in Photographs

Thursday, September 24, 2015
by Peter Ingle
The Soul of Charleston in Photographs

JACK ALTERMAN’S exquisite new book, My City, captures the majesty and timeless beauty of Charleston in a way that few photographers or painters have ever managed to do. It will undoubtedly stir you to look again—with a keener eye—at very familiar buildings and places. Jack’s resplendent photos, which focus on the lower peninsula, are breathtaking and full of surprises due... Read »

Bach Society of Charleston Inaugural Event

Saturday, September 12, 2015
by ChasToday
Bach Society of Charleston Inaugural Event

THE BEAUTIFUL ACOUSTIC of First (Scots) Presbyterian Church will be the place to hear the subtle nuances of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, played on period instruments and sung by one of Charleston’s favorite duos: Margaret Kelly Cook, soprano, and Ricard Bordas, countertenor. This free-to-the-public opening event of the newly organized Bach Society of Charleston can... Read »

The Grand Bohemian: Come Be Surprised!

Thursday, September 10, 2015
by Peter Ingle
The Grand Bohemian: Come Be Surprised!

THE NEW HOTEL on the corner of Meeting and Wentworth—the latest addition to The Kessler Collection—is everything you may need and almost nothing you might expect. Don’t let the inconspicuous exterior of The Grand Bohemian fool you. Inside is a vintage ambiance where modern eclectic merges with upscale whimsical in a playful, almost daring mix of... Read »

Weilerstein and Barnatan Dazzle at Dock Street

Sunday, June 7, 2015
by William Furtwangler
Weilerstein and Barnatan Dazzle at Dock Street

THE THURSDAY MORNING Spoleto Festival USA chamber music series offered amazing musical performances. Violinist Daniel Phillips, Kevin Payne, lute, and Christopher Costanza, cello, caught the 18th century spirit of Giuseppe Tartini’s famous Violin Sonata in G Minor “Devil’s Trill.” Phillips mastered the intricate and devilish piece with jaw-dropping skill that had to be heard to be believed.... Read »

Pianist Eduardo Monteiro Mesmerizes CAM

Saturday, March 7, 2015
by Peter Ingle
Pianist Eduardo Monteiro Mesmerizes CAM

SOME MUSICIANS have an obvious love affair with playing music. In the case of CAM’s guest pianist, Eduardo Monteiro, you get the feeling that he does nothing else day and night except play piano, all the while relishing the privilege as he wrings out every drop of sound and feeling you can imagine. Mr. Monteiro comes... Read »

The Mystery of Creation in the Arts

Sunday, February 8, 2015
by Peter Ingle
The Mystery of Creation in the Arts

WHEN LISTENING to a beautiful piece of music, it is not easy to realize that the sound of each note emerges from utter stillness and silence—from an immaculate void that houses and then gives birth to the creation of sound. It is also not easy, after being richly satisfied by listening, to realize that... Read »

A Love Letter to Charleston

Tuesday, October 21, 2014
by ChasToday

Want to appreciate our beautiful city all over again? Watch this gorgeous video from the Charleston Area Visitor’s Bureau. »

Looking with Rembrandt

Monday, October 20, 2014
by Peter Ingle
Looking with Rembrandt

THE ETCHINGS OF REMBRANDT—far less known than his resplendent oil paintings—comprise some of his finest work. Despite their comparatively diminutive size, they offer the viewer unending wonder and delight. Like drawings, etchings are often an indicator of artistic talent because they rely on—and hence reveal—the fundamentals of good draughtsmanship. At their best, they demonstrate... Read »

A Fun Book to Give and Have

Wednesday, August 13, 2014
by ChasToday
A Fun Book to Give and Have

THIS BOOK GIVES YOU A HAPPY FEELING. Charleston A to Z is a clever, colorful, and charming tour of local history. A perfect gift for a child and a nice reminder for adults. Full of key historical facts about Charleston—all the things we know but take for granted and let slip by. Author Rob... Read »

A Local Perspective on Dance

Friday, May 23, 2014
by Eliza Ingle
A Local Perspective on Dance

THERE IS A BUZZ IN THE AIR as Spoleto opens and you can feel an energy shift in people’s schedules as the cultural landscape opens up to new work and ideas. There are other faces on the streets that look different from the usual tourists because they are instead opera singers, costume designers, and choreographers—the... Read »

Playwrights-in-Residence at Threshold

Saturday, February 22, 2014
by Carol Furtwangler
Playwrights-in-Residence at Threshold

THE LOCALLY-BASED WRITING TEAM of Thomas & Judy Heath is not so local any more: How ya gonna keep ‘em down in the South after they’ve seen New York? Friday evening, Threshold Repertory Theatre was filled beyond capacity for “An Evening of Words & Actors” featuring the work of the Heaths, first-ever Playwrights-in-Residence at... Read »

Get to the Gibbes for This One

Monday, November 25, 2013
by Peter Ingle
Get to the Gibbes for This One

“THE REAL WAR will never get in the books,” wrote Walt Whitman reflecting on the human carnage, physical devastation, and psychological toll of the Civil War. No doubt, it is true of all wars, despite the prolific and horrific photographs of the last 150 years. You think you’ve seen it, but have you really?... Read »

‘Impressions’ from the Columbia Museum of Art

Sunday, February 17, 2013
by Peter Ingle
‘Impressions’ from the Columbia Museum of Art

FIFTY-FIVE JEWELS of Impressionism are on display at the Columbia Museum of Art (until April 21). There are no renowned masterpieces in the exhibit entitled from Monet to Matisse, but don’t let that fool you. These gems offer a unique glimpse into the Impressionist school. Fifty-five paintings is too many to review, and you... Read »

The Art of Superb Design

Friday, November 16, 2012
by ChasToday
The Art of Superb Design

DIETER RAMS is the lengendary designer of Braun products. He revolutionized modern design and is the primary inspiration for Apple’s chief designer, Jonathan Ive. In the video below, Rams talks about design. Listed beneath are his 10 principles of good design—an endless source of nourishment for artists in every field. “I think that good... Read »

Looking Through the Cracks of the Unusual

Thursday, June 7, 2012
by Eliza Ingle
Looking Through the Cracks of the Unusual

A CRACK IN EVERYTHING by husband and wife team Zoe/Juniper does indeed break apart our perceptions of space, time, and reality with a performance that magically blends video and movement. And though the artists are not the first to work this way, they handle this experience in a most inventive and unusual way which... Read »

Nuttall Plays “Second Fiddle” in This One

Sunday, June 3, 2012
by Peter Ingle
Nuttall Plays “Second Fiddle” in This One

AS IN, “second fiddle” to his wife and talented violinist, Livia Sohn, during Program VI of the Spoleto chamber series. Together they performed the short Étude-caprice by Henry Wieniawski (1835-1880) who was himself a virtuoso violinist. Geoff described the piece as an analogy to married life. Livia, of course, played the “difficult” passages, Geoff... Read »

Natalia Khoma Talks about the Bach Cello Suites

Monday, May 14, 2012
by ChasToday

Cellist Natalia Khoma talks about J.S. Bach’s 6 unaccompanied suites for cello which she will perform during 2012 Piccolo Spoleto. For more information about the May 25 (suites 1–3) and May 29 (suites 4–6) concerts, click here. Part 1 Part 2 »

Premier of Edward Hart’s “Under an Indigo Sky”

Friday, February 3, 2012
by ChasToday
Premier of Edward Hart’s “Under an Indigo Sky”

Edward Hart’s “love letter to South Carolina”—his latest violin concerto formally entitled Under an Indigo Sky—will premier at the Gaillard Auditorium on Saturday, February 11, 2012. Charleston Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Yuriy Bekker (for whom the piece was written) will be featured with the orchestra led by guest conductor Darko Butorac, the Music Director of... Read »

An interview with violinist Lee-Chin Siow

Tuesday, January 31, 2012
by ChasToday
An interview with violinist Lee-Chin Siow

LEE-CHIN SIOW is the Director of Strings and Professor of Violin at the College of Charleston, and co-founder and artistic co-director of Charleston Music Fest. She has been recognized and awarded in her home country of Singapore as well as in her adopted home of South Carolina and Charleston, from where she regularly travels... Read »

Learning From the Hudson School Painters

Saturday, January 7, 2012
by Peter Ingle
Learning From the Hudson School Painters

SOMETIMES it takes an art exhibit to remind us that, as fast and formidably as America has developed, the most monumental thing about this country is its vast and varied landscape which offers awe-inspiring views of Nature. The nineteenth-century Hudson River School Painters certainly understood this and strove mightily to convey it—which makes for... Read »

The Genius of Rembrandt in Raleigh

Tuesday, January 3, 2012
by Peter Ingle
The Genius of Rembrandt in Raleigh

THE GOOD NEWS is that it is the largest collection of Rembrandt paintings ever presented in an American exhibition. The unfortunate part is that they are on display for only another 3 weeks (through January 22) at the North Carolina Museum of Art (NCMA) in Raleigh. Featured are 27 autograph paintings, plus another 23... Read »

Cunningham’s Last Stand

Thursday, December 29, 2011
by Eliza Ingle
Cunningham’s Last Stand

A FEW WEEKS AGO I made a pilgrimage to the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) to see the second to last performance of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Like me, many of you might think traveling to Brooklyn is on the same adventure level as traveling to Tasmania, but it can be easily reached... Read »

Opera Through Conductors’ Eyes

Tuesday, September 6, 2011
by ChasToday
Opera Through Conductors’ Eyes

WHAT MAKES OPERA so powerful, so inspiring? And what is so unique about the art of conducting opera versus orchestral music? There are a lot of answers to these questions, but a great place to start is with some of the world’s leading opera conductors who in this interview share their knowledge of, insight... Read »

A Flair for the Flute

Wednesday, August 31, 2011
by Peter Ingle
A Flair for the Flute

FLUTIST MONICA TARAGANO hails from Argentina, lives in Paris, and performs around the world both as a soloist and with the ensemble she co-founded, AlmaViva. At its core, AlmaViva is a unique piano, guitar, and flute trio with impassioned musicianship and impeccable style. They compel you to listen and to keep listening, which you... Read »

Do You Know This Artist?

Wednesday, August 31, 2011
by Peter Ingle
Do You Know This Artist?

WHEN SHE IS NOT GIVING workshops, or painting the Lowcountry or the streets of Paris, Hilarie Lambert spends her days tucked away in a charming second-story studio on Broad Street. The narrow rooms, adorned with oil paintings, exude a fresh, distinct, invigorating style in a wide range of themes—all with a very human touch.... Read »

Charleston Arts’ Sad Loss

Monday, July 18, 2011
by Eliza Ingle
Charleston Arts’ Sad Loss

THE LOWCOUNTRY LOST one of its brightest stars on July 15th when Robert Ivey passed away leaving behind a long lineage of actors, singers, dancers, and fans who had been inspired, mentored, and directed by the legendary man for more than 30 years. I first met Mr. Ivey 20 years ago when I sent... Read »

A Chat with Cellist Alisa Weilerstein

Friday, June 24, 2011
by Lindsay Koob
A Chat with Cellist Alisa Weilerstein

OVER THE PAST EIGHT FESTIVALS, the Spoleto chamber music series’ distinguished cellist, Alisa Weilerstein, has emerged as an artist that I’ve described as a true “Spoleto darling.” That came as a result of both the superb technical qualities and the emotionally overwhelming nature of her playing—as well as the public’s inevitable reaction to it.... Read »

The Fun & Bawdy Red Light Musical

Wednesday, May 18, 2011
by Carol Furtwangler
The Fun & Bawdy Red Light Musical

CALL IT WHAT YOU WILL—house of ill repute, dorm for denizens of the red light district, brothel, bawdyhouse, bordello—it is still a whorehouse, where women charge money for sex. You wouldn’t think the world’s oldest profession would be a likely subject of an upbeat, uproarious, successful musical comedy and film. But “The Best Little... Read »

Talking About David Stahl

Monday, April 4, 2011
by ChasToday
Talking About David Stahl

The Charleston Symphony Chorus will perform the Brahms Requiem as a tribute to Maestro David Stahl on April 16, 2011 at Memminger Auditorium. Here’s our interview with Director, Dr. Robert Taylor as he talks about David and the upcoming performance. »

Keely Enright, director

Friday, March 11, 2011
by Peter Ingle
Keely Enright, director

Keely Enright is the founder and producing director of The Village Playhouse and Repertory Company in Mt Pleasant, SC. A native of Los Angeles and graduate of UCLA, she moved to Charleston 15 years ago to start her own theatre. She and her husband, managing director Dave Reinwald (who regularly acts as well as... Read »

Marco Sartor, guitar

Thursday, March 10, 2011
by Peter Ingle
Marco Sartor, guitar

Buy tickets to Marco’s March 15 performance at the Dock Street Theatre. Classical guitarist, Marco Sartor, lives in Charleston, SC where he teaches at the Charleston Academy of Music, and from where he travels extensively to give concerts and master classes. Marco was born in Montevideo, Uruguay and is a top prize winner in... Read »

Collector Norton Simon

Friday, February 4, 2011
by ChasToday
Collector Norton Simon

THERE IS a small, prestigious museum in Pasadena, California that “doesn’t buy, or lend, or borrow any of its works—and it doesn’t put on blockbuster shows, either. But what it does is display glorious works of art with elegance and style…” It also had a curious beginning: “There happened to be an art gallery... Read »

Portrait from the Past?

Friday, January 28, 2011
by ChasToday
Portrait from the Past?

WHICH ONE do you like? Are they both originals? The one on the left is the famous and familiar self-portrait by Raphael, which hangs in the Ufizzi in Florence. The one on the right was recently rediscovered in a bank vault. Read more about them at the i09 web site and Discovery News. You... Read »

Billy Collins Was Here

Monday, January 24, 2011
by Eliza Ingle
Billy Collins Was Here

TO CLIMB the stairs of the Charleston Library Society’s historic building on King Street under a full moon on a cold January evening to hear Billy Collins read his poetry for members of the Poetry Society of South Carolina Society was a winter highlight. Although this exclusive event was offered only to the Poetry Society (whose... Read »

Inspiring Art Visits the Gibbes

Friday, January 21, 2011
by Peter Ingle
Inspiring Art Visits the Gibbes

SOMETIMES it is worth visiting an exhibit to see just one excellent work. In this case, however, there is more than one fine work and seeing them will definitely satisfy your artistic taste buds. I know I will be back for a second and third peek before March 27 when this exhibit closes. Now... Read »

Unsettling Beauty

Sunday, January 16, 2011
by Peter Ingle
Unsettling Beauty

THE FIRST THING that strikes you is the majesty, the serenity, the colors. Then you understand what you’re looking at, and it becomes heart-wrenching. An exhibit poster at the Gibbes Museum of Art says it best: “At first glance the brilliantly colored, impasto-like patterns that J. Henry Fair captures with his camera... Read »

N.Y. City At Christmas

Wednesday, December 15, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
N.Y. City At Christmas

THERE IS NOTHING more festive than New York City adorned in its Christmas splendor. The department store windows on Fifth Avenue never cease to boost the heart and soul of anyone who sees them, and always at the top of the delights stands the tree at Rockefeller Plaza which, no matter your age, prompts... Read »

Stan Gill, director

Sunday, November 28, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Stan Gill, director

IF YOU THINK Sprouts Childrens Theatre is just for kids, think again. I can safely promise that parents won’t be able to wipe the smile off their faces or stop laughing at these fairy tales told so humorously and intelligently by director Stan Gill’s cast of actors and musicians. The youngest kids sit eagerly... Read »

Learning With Our Young Artists

Wednesday, November 17, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Learning With Our Young Artists

IT HAS BEEN around for a long time. But the Monday Night Concert Series at the Simons Center Recital Hall, produced by Steve Rosenberg and the College of Charleston School of the Arts, is still a hidden—and very affordable—jewel in Charleston’s music scene. No, these are not world-class musicians (yet). No, the one hour... Read »

Through the Eyes of a Painter

Wednesday, November 10, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Through the Eyes of a Painter

THIS WAS NOT just another walk in the park. It was a three-hour witnessing of the artistic process—in this case, oil paintings coming to life. As part of a fundraiser, members of the Charleston Fine Arts Dealers’ Association (CFADA) gathered in the dappled morning light of Washington Park on a crisp, clear November morning.... Read »

Former Marine Talks Filmmaking

Sunday, November 7, 2010
by ChasToday
Former Marine Talks Filmmaking

TREVOR ERICKSON is a former U.S. Marine turned filmmaker, actor, and martial arts performer. He created the role of Henry Felder, Jr. in the original play, “Captain Felder’s Cannon” and repeated the role for the feature film version, “All For Liberty,” the action-adventure feature film shot in South Carolina about an American Revolutionary War... Read »

Sandra Nikolajevs, Chamber Music Charleston

Wednesday, August 25, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Sandra Nikolajevs, Chamber Music Charleston

CHAMBER MUSIC CHARLESTON’s second annual “Mozart in the South” festival is coming September 9–12. Along with a chamber night, an orchestral evening, and the finale at Middleton Place, there will be the popular Little Mozart Circus at Francis Marion Square (with 14 tents) where children of all ages can handle instruments, get a lesson,... Read »

A Window into Art

Tuesday, June 29, 2010
by Peter Ingle
A Window into Art

VISITING AN ART GALLERY is almost always a visit to the past; to representations of people, places, and relics of days gone by. It’s not that you go to see the past for its own sake. You go to see the art as art. But sometimes you go deeper. Without really trying, you can... Read »

City of Art

Thursday, June 10, 2010
by Peter Ingle
City of Art

MOST VISITORS to St. Petersburg go to the Hermitage, and rightly so. It houses one of the world’s most large, if not largest, art collection in a former czar’s palace (the Winter Palace) where the Revolution of 1917 was staged, and where each room boasts a unique parquet floor, wall paneling, molding, and window... Read »

Dance: Noon and Night

Sunday, June 6, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
Dance: Noon and Night

ONE LAYER of Lucinda Childs’ DANCE is the eleven dancers who spill across the stage with movement that is like a live feed of entrances and exits in head-spinning sequences that are contained in constant parameters, and propelled by the pulsating flurry of the Philip Glass score which is experienced behind the final layer... Read »

Temporary French Art

Monday, May 31, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Temporary French Art

TEMPORARY BECAUSE you can eat it—which you will do… quickly. We’re talking fresh pastries, baguettes, and macaroons made daily by a superior French pastry chef at the new Macaroon Boutique on John Street. The front door is usually open, delectable pastries loom on open shelves, enchanting co-owner Fabienne is at the cashier, and maestro... Read »

Spoleto Opera and Art

Sunday, May 30, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
Spoleto Opera and Art

THE FIRST DAYS of Spoleto have, for me, been preoccupied with my eldest daughter’s graduation from the school she has attended for the last eight years. This departure before a new beginning has overshadowed my usual feeling of the festival’s whirlwind kickoff. Nevertheless, I have gotten to a few events. As an opera amateur,... Read »

Gallim Dance: What’s Modern Today?

Sunday, May 30, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
Gallim Dance: What’s Modern Today?

TODAY’S MODERN DANCERS are not dealing with the emotional palate of yesterday. Their responses to the world deal with an ever-changing sense of psychology, technology, and culture. The form of modern dance is at its best when the perspective is fresh, the movement is original, and the performers are invested—which was true of the... Read »

A Painter’s Way Through Poetry

Thursday, May 20, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
A Painter’s Way Through Poetry

“YOU GO WHERE your life takes you,” mused artist Kat Hastie in a conversation we recently had about an upcoming show where visual art and poetry meet. “Contemporary Charleston 2010: Influence” runs at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park from May 20 through July 3 with an exhibit that matches 10 poets with 10... Read »

First Baptist Church

Monday, May 10, 2010
by ChasToday
First Baptist Church

ROBERT MILLS, architect of First Baptist Church, described it as, “the best specimen of correct taste in architecture of the modern buildings in this city. It is purely Greek in its style, simply grand in its proportions, and beautiful in its detail.” He was mistaken only in its being purely Greek in style, but... Read »

The Little Festival with a Big Punch

Monday, May 3, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
The Little Festival with a Big Punch

AS SPRING BLEEDS into summer, don’t forget the other frolic that kicks off in tandem with Spoleto USA. While the “big” one toots its horn about being an international festival, Piccolo Spoleto boasts the continuous discovery of homegrown talent—artists, writers, and performers from Charleston and around the southeast. Ellen Dresler Moryl launched Piccolo Spoleto... Read »

What Was Whistler Thinking?

Thursday, April 22, 2010
by Peter Ingle
What Was Whistler Thinking?

THAT’S THE QUESTION I kept asking myself as I gazed into the intimate world of James McNeill Whistler’s etchings at the Gibbes (until May 16, 2010). When you look at oil paintings you are generally aware of standing in front of them looking at them. But with etchings, especially good ones, you somehow step... Read »

Huguenot Church

Thursday, April 15, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Huguenot Church

GOTHIC WAS ONE of the latest styles introduced in antebellum Charleston, and decorative details of the Gothic style pervade the Huguenot Church at 136 Church Street. The highlights include pointed windows, pier buttresses (the extending supports on the outside of the church) with pinnacles, and simulated vaulting. Even the cast iron fence has Gothic... Read »

St. Philip’s Protestant Episcopal Church

Sunday, April 11, 2010
by Peter Ingle
St. Philip’s Protestant Episcopal Church

THE CURRENT BUILDING at 146 Church Street is the third St. Philip’s Church. It is from an 1836 design by Joseph Hyde which partly replicates the second St. Philip’s that was constructed c. 1721–1733, but which burned in 1835. The exterior of the building closely follows the c. 1721 design, although the interior was... Read »

The Churches of Charleston

Thursday, April 8, 2010
by Peter Ingle
The Churches of Charleston

WHILE CHARLESTON’S historical homes and buildings continue to enchant residents and dazzle tourists, the city’s churches merit special attention and study. You can easily gaze at their designs and details for hours at a time and not see everything. Which is why repeat visits for repeated gazing always yield new treasures. But how is... Read »

Observing Art… With Kids!

Tuesday, April 6, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
Observing Art… With Kids!

ON A RECENT TRIP to the Big Apple with my eleven- and seven-year-olds, I was faced with the realization that viewing art with children is never as satisfying as you dream it will be. Something like, “the best laid plans go to waste” came to mind. I’m not saying the experience was not beneficial... Read »

Elihu Hall Bay House

Monday, March 15, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Elihu Hall Bay House

76 Meeting Street • 1785 THE ALLEY ON ONE SIDE of this house, and a wide yard on the other, served as protective fire breaks. Single houses like this were often built of wood for coolness. The Duke de la Rochefoucault-Liancourt, commenting on the frequent preference for wood, and on the asymmetrical piazza, wrote... Read »

Enrique Graf, piano mentor

Wednesday, March 10, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Enrique Graf, piano mentor

AS PROMISED, below is part 2 of our interview with Enrique Graf, Artist in Residence at the College of Charleston, who will be performing next Tuesday night at the Sottile Theatre. The interview speaks for itself, but here are a few more interesting things you might want to know about Enrique’s background. He was... Read »

Enrique Graf, pianist

Tuesday, March 9, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Enrique Graf, pianist

THE INTERNATIONAL PIANO SERIES at the College of Charleston just keeps getting better—largely due to its founder and chief nurturer, Enrique Graf, who will perform next week in the series’ fourth solo concert this year. CharlestonToday sat down recently with Enrique (see the video below) to get more insight into his upcoming concert and... Read »

Landscapes for Music

Sunday, March 7, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Landscapes for Music

THIS IS JUST ONE of the stunning photos by Michael Kahn (it’s huge) at Martin Gallery on Broad Street. And the serenity of his work could hardly have been better complemented than by a recent performance in the gallery by Chamber Music Charleston. I had heard four of the five musicians before, so I... Read »

War, Kids, and Chocolate

Tuesday, February 2, 2010
by Peter Ingle
War, Kids, and Chocolate

IN THE AFTERMATH of World War II, Germany was divided and the Soviet Union quickly isolated East Germany from the west. Supplies were scarce, so under direction of President Harry Truman, the Allied Forces began the Berlin Airlift. For 15 months, British and American pilots flew more than 277,000 missions to drop more than... Read »

Super Soloist at Sottile

Monday, February 1, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Super Soloist at Sottile

CHARLESTON, which has slowly become a mecca for musicians, now boasts its own piano prodigy in Micah McLaurin, a 15-year-old native who will be performing next Tuesday at the College of Charleston’s 2009–2010 International Piano Series. This is the third concert in a series featuring Enrique Graf and three of his protégés. Micah will... Read »

A New York Travelogue

Tuesday, January 26, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
A New York Travelogue

THERE IS SOMETHING ABOUT climbing the steps to the Metropolitan Museum of Art on the upper east side of the great island of Manhattan. You never know if you might run into someone you know or if you will anonymously slide into to the great house of art where anything is possible. I had... Read »

Jory Vinikour, harpsichord

Monday, January 25, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Jory Vinikour, harpsichord

YOU’LL BE ONE OF THE LUCKY ONES if you catch this article in time to hear Jory Vinikour play harpsichord tonight at the College of Charleston Monday Night Series at the Simmons Center. Jory, who performed at last year’s Bach Festival Charleston (read that review here), will perform two dazzling keyboard works: J. S.... Read »

School of the Arts now State-of-the-Art

Friday, January 15, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
School of the Arts now State-of-the-Art

WALKING PAST the cistern at the College of Charleston, I am struck by the sense of time and place at one of our country’s oldest colleges. Spanish moss hangs from grand oaks that frame the columns and fading pink walls of colonial architecture. It is a scene of southern tradition and charm. As I... Read »

James Louis Petigru Law Office

Tuesday, December 1, 2009
by Peter Ingle
James Louis Petigru Law Office

8 St. Michael’s Alley • 1848-1849. James Louis Petigru, a lawyer who lived on Broad Street, hired Edward Brickell White to design an office large enough for a partner, clerks, and law library (which is now in the Library of Congress). This building replaced an existing law office that had been on the site.... Read »

Ann Peacock House

Monday, November 23, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Ann Peacock House

96 Church Street • c. 1760 Ann Peacock was prevented from building against the back wall of Mary Cooper’s house at 94 Church. She decided then to build her house on the opposite corner of her lot, a choice that enabled the eventual owner of the corner lot behind hers to build against her... Read »

Mary Cooper House

Friday, October 30, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Mary Cooper House

94 Church Street • c. 1760 The left side of this house is a largely blank wall with only two stair windows, but Mary Cooper could be certain that this back wall would not be tied into another house. Consequently it was given a dentil cornice and string course like the ones on the... Read »

Alexander Christie House

Tuesday, October 20, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Alexander Christie House

92 Church Street • c. 1809 The site for this house, which is wide enough to have accommodated a double house (like 87 Church Street, the Heyward-Washington House), shows that single houses were not necessarily preferred because of the narrowness of their lots. Actually, the original lots in the city were about 100 feet... Read »

Cabbage Row (Catfish Row)

Saturday, October 10, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Cabbage Row (Catfish Row)

89-91 Church Street • c. 1783 This row is a late but major example of a pair of houses with a central arcade and well-preserved, commercial ground floors. The row is similar to 83-85 Church Street, but is three-storied rather than two. The name “Cabbage Row” comes from cabbages and other vegetables that were... Read »

Daniel Heyward (Washington) House

Sunday, October 4, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Daniel Heyward (Washington) House

87 Church Street • c. 1770–1772 This house was constructed by Daniel Heyward, the father of Thomas Heyward, a signer of the Declaration of Independence who grew up here. He acquired the property in 1770 and his widow inherited it in 1777. A coin dated 1772 found within a window frame provides an approximate... Read »

John Lloyd House

Monday, September 28, 2009
by Peter Ingle
John Lloyd House

90 Church Street • c. 1760. This single house and the three single houses to the north of it at nos. 92–96 Church Street are examples of the best constructed single houses of the second half of the 18th century. These outstanding examples are typical in being of brick, three-stories, and three-bays wide with... Read »

Isaac Mazyck House

Friday, September 25, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Isaac Mazyck House

86 Church Street • c. 1783 The 1778 fire destroyed, for a second time, nearly all of the eastern half of Charleston which had been within its original walls. No building survived on the east side of Church Street from no. 90 through no. 54. Soon after the Revolutionary War ended, this distinctive house... Read »

Blake Tenements

Tuesday, September 22, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Blake Tenements

2–4 Courthouse Square • 1760–1772 The site of the District Courthouse at the corner of Meeting and Broad Streets has only one of the four squares that were planned for this intersection when the town was initially laid out. At the northwest corner of the square, in the alley next to the courthouse, is... Read »

William Hendricks Tenements

Sunday, September 20, 2009
by Peter Ingle
William Hendricks Tenements

83–85 Church Street • 1749–1751 This pair of buildings shares an open passage that leads to the entrances to the dwellings above. On the street side are the original shop fronts. (Notice also the difference between the two doors: the one at No. 83 is more narrow, has a different transom window above it,... Read »

Thomas Lamboll’s Tenements

Thursday, September 17, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Thomas Lamboll’s Tenements

8–10 Tradd Street • c. 1726 This pair of houses was built back-to-back against a common wall. Each is a mirror image of the other. The gambrel roof has a unique overhang to shed the dormers on the sides. A covenant in a 1726 deed for this property required that the alleys on each... Read »

Daniel Hext Tenement

Monday, September 14, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Daniel Hext Tenement

7 Tradd Street • c. 1740 The area fire of 1740 destroyed all or nearly all houses from Broad Street to Water Street and from East Bay Street to Church Street. Consequently, the houses on both sides of Tradd from East Bay to Church were probably constructed in 1740 and afterward. But in many... Read »

James Gordon House

Friday, September 11, 2009
by Peter Ingle
James Gordon House

87 East Bay Street • c. 1792 This is a Charleston single house of unusual height and width. It is one-room wide with a central stair hall in the middle and rooms to either side. The private entrance is off the street, on the left side of the building. It is not a typical... Read »

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It is with life as it is with art: the deeper one penetrates, the broader the view.                   
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