Architecture

The Soul of Charleston in Photographs

Thursday, September 24, 2015
by Peter Ingle
The Soul of Charleston in Photographs

JACK ALTERMAN’S exquisite new book, My City, captures the majesty and timeless beauty of Charleston in a way that few photographers or painters have ever managed to do. It will undoubtedly stir you to look again—with a keener eye—at very familiar buildings and places. Jack’s resplendent photos, which focus on the lower peninsula, are breathtaking and full of surprises due... Read »

A Love Letter to Charleston

Tuesday, October 21, 2014
by ChasToday

Want to appreciate our beautiful city all over again? Watch this gorgeous video from the Charleston Area Visitor’s Bureau. »

First Baptist Church

Monday, May 10, 2010
by ChasToday
First Baptist Church

ROBERT MILLS, architect of First Baptist Church, described it as, “the best specimen of correct taste in architecture of the modern buildings in this city. It is purely Greek in its style, simply grand in its proportions, and beautiful in its detail.” He was mistaken only in its being purely Greek in style, but... Read »

Huguenot Church

Thursday, April 15, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Huguenot Church

GOTHIC WAS ONE of the latest styles introduced in antebellum Charleston, and decorative details of the Gothic style pervade the Huguenot Church at 136 Church Street. The highlights include pointed windows, pier buttresses (the extending supports on the outside of the church) with pinnacles, and simulated vaulting. Even the cast iron fence has Gothic... Read »

St. Philip’s Protestant Episcopal Church

Sunday, April 11, 2010
by Peter Ingle
St. Philip’s Protestant Episcopal Church

THE CURRENT BUILDING at 146 Church Street is the third St. Philip’s Church. It is from an 1836 design by Joseph Hyde which partly replicates the second St. Philip’s that was constructed c. 1721–1733, but which burned in 1835. The exterior of the building closely follows the c. 1721 design, although the interior was... Read »

The Churches of Charleston

Thursday, April 8, 2010
by Peter Ingle
The Churches of Charleston

WHILE CHARLESTON’S historical homes and buildings continue to enchant residents and dazzle tourists, the city’s churches merit special attention and study. You can easily gaze at their designs and details for hours at a time and not see everything. Which is why repeat visits for repeated gazing always yield new treasures. But how is... Read »

Elihu Hall Bay House

Monday, March 15, 2010
by Peter Ingle
Elihu Hall Bay House

76 Meeting Street • 1785 THE ALLEY ON ONE SIDE of this house, and a wide yard on the other, served as protective fire breaks. Single houses like this were often built of wood for coolness. The Duke de la Rochefoucault-Liancourt, commenting on the frequent preference for wood, and on the asymmetrical piazza, wrote... Read »

James Louis Petigru Law Office

Tuesday, December 1, 2009
by Peter Ingle
James Louis Petigru Law Office

8 St. Michael’s Alley • 1848-1849. James Louis Petigru, a lawyer who lived on Broad Street, hired Edward Brickell White to design an office large enough for a partner, clerks, and law library (which is now in the Library of Congress). This building replaced an existing law office that had been on the site.... Read »

Ann Peacock House

Monday, November 23, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Ann Peacock House

96 Church Street • c. 1760 Ann Peacock was prevented from building against the back wall of Mary Cooper’s house at 94 Church. She decided then to build her house on the opposite corner of her lot, a choice that enabled the eventual owner of the corner lot behind hers to build against her... Read »

Mary Cooper House

Friday, October 30, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Mary Cooper House

94 Church Street • c. 1760 The left side of this house is a largely blank wall with only two stair windows, but Mary Cooper could be certain that this back wall would not be tied into another house. Consequently it was given a dentil cornice and string course like the ones on the... Read »

Alexander Christie House

Tuesday, October 20, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Alexander Christie House

92 Church Street • c. 1809 The site for this house, which is wide enough to have accommodated a double house (like 87 Church Street, the Heyward-Washington House), shows that single houses were not necessarily preferred because of the narrowness of their lots. Actually, the original lots in the city were about 100 feet... Read »

Cabbage Row (Catfish Row)

Saturday, October 10, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Cabbage Row (Catfish Row)

89-91 Church Street • c. 1783 This row is a late but major example of a pair of houses with a central arcade and well-preserved, commercial ground floors. The row is similar to 83-85 Church Street, but is three-storied rather than two. The name “Cabbage Row” comes from cabbages and other vegetables that were... Read »

Daniel Heyward (Washington) House

Sunday, October 4, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Daniel Heyward (Washington) House

87 Church Street • c. 1770–1772 This house was constructed by Daniel Heyward, the father of Thomas Heyward, a signer of the Declaration of Independence who grew up here. He acquired the property in 1770 and his widow inherited it in 1777. A coin dated 1772 found within a window frame provides an approximate... Read »

John Lloyd House

Monday, September 28, 2009
by Peter Ingle
John Lloyd House

90 Church Street • c. 1760. This single house and the three single houses to the north of it at nos. 92–96 Church Street are examples of the best constructed single houses of the second half of the 18th century. These outstanding examples are typical in being of brick, three-stories, and three-bays wide with... Read »

Isaac Mazyck House

Friday, September 25, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Isaac Mazyck House

86 Church Street • c. 1783 The 1778 fire destroyed, for a second time, nearly all of the eastern half of Charleston which had been within its original walls. No building survived on the east side of Church Street from no. 90 through no. 54. Soon after the Revolutionary War ended, this distinctive house... Read »

Blake Tenements

Tuesday, September 22, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Blake Tenements

2–4 Courthouse Square • 1760–1772 The site of the District Courthouse at the corner of Meeting and Broad Streets has only one of the four squares that were planned for this intersection when the town was initially laid out. At the northwest corner of the square, in the alley next to the courthouse, is... Read »

William Hendricks Tenements

Sunday, September 20, 2009
by Peter Ingle
William Hendricks Tenements

83–85 Church Street • 1749–1751 This pair of buildings shares an open passage that leads to the entrances to the dwellings above. On the street side are the original shop fronts. (Notice also the difference between the two doors: the one at No. 83 is more narrow, has a different transom window above it,... Read »

Thomas Lamboll’s Tenements

Thursday, September 17, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Thomas Lamboll’s Tenements

8–10 Tradd Street • c. 1726 This pair of houses was built back-to-back against a common wall. Each is a mirror image of the other. The gambrel roof has a unique overhang to shed the dormers on the sides. A covenant in a 1726 deed for this property required that the alleys on each... Read »

Daniel Hext Tenement

Monday, September 14, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Daniel Hext Tenement

7 Tradd Street • c. 1740 The area fire of 1740 destroyed all or nearly all houses from Broad Street to Water Street and from East Bay Street to Church Street. Consequently, the houses on both sides of Tradd from East Bay to Church were probably constructed in 1740 and afterward. But in many... Read »

James Gordon House

Friday, September 11, 2009
by Peter Ingle
James Gordon House

87 East Bay Street • c. 1792 This is a Charleston single house of unusual height and width. It is one-room wide with a central stair hall in the middle and rooms to either side. The private entrance is off the street, on the left side of the building. It is not a typical... Read »

Beale Row

Wednesday, September 9, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Beale Row

95-103 East Bay Street • c. 1741 Row houses were the usual type of house constructed in cities for thousands of years, and in most American cities this was the principal type that was built. The main characteristic was a common wall shared on both sides of each building, with no space in between... Read »

Looking at Charleston

Tuesday, September 8, 2009
by Peter Ingle
Looking at Charleston

ALL THE ENTRIES in this series will derive from text and photos by architectural historian Gene Waddell, archivist at the College of Charleston. We hope these excerpts will allow you to benefit from Gene’s scholarly insight into the unique architecture of this city. The origin of Gene’s material is his unpublished, copyrighted architectural guide... Read »

It is with life as it is with art: the deeper one penetrates, the broader the view.                   
~ Johann Goethe


Read the review at A Window Into Russia blog
“You have some of our money and we have some of your wine.” ~ Clos Saron

The churches of Charleston are unique in their variety, grandeur, and architecture. We give you an in-depth view.
~> Read more