Insight

Call me ‘Bo’

Sunday, August 20, 2017
by ChasToday
Call me ‘Bo’

I GREW UP with his children as our families regularly beached, sailed, hunted, and socialized together. To us, he was always ‘Mr. Morrison’, which is how I greeted him after being away from Charleston for more than 30 years. As soon as the words came out of my mouth, he held my handshake warmly... Read »

Into the Nothingness of Godot

Monday, May 29, 2017
by Peter Ingle
Into the Nothingness of Godot

“WAITING FOR GODOT” has long held fascination and been a challenge for theater goers. Who exactly is Godot? What might Godot represent? Why are two homeless men “waiting” for him? How do the other three characters fit into the picture? These and other questions inevitably arise because nothing happens in the play. It is “much... Read »

STEM versus the Arts — YES

Sunday, April 30, 2017
by Peter Ingle
STEM versus the Arts — YES

As published in The Post & Courier March 28, 2017 MUCH IS MADE ABOUT science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and for good reason. Throughout history their ingenuity has propelled us to continuous new heights. Think nuclear power, computers, the internet, and smartphones. Before those came the internal combustion engine, the telephone, radio, TV,... Read »

Cuba — Island of Contrasts

Tuesday, December 8, 2015
by Eliza Ingle
Cuba — Island of Contrasts

OUR GROUP OF 22 AMERICANS stood together in the hot, pungent, laundry-strewn courtyard of an apartment building in the center of bustling Havana, Cuba. We had assembled to listen to a local city planner talk about the gems and eyesores of a city where both are equally represented. He was young and passionate about his city... Read »

Kudos to The Colour of Music Festival

Thursday, October 29, 2015
by Ty Collins
Kudos to The Colour of Music Festival

So be ye patient! Success, as we have come to accept it, is expressed as some metric, but we also accept the intrinsic, incalculable joy of the moment that it brings. So sums up Charleston’s third annual Colour of Music Festival (COMF). The audacity of classically trained musicians of color ascending the main stages... Read »

IMAGINE there’s no adverts… it’s easy if you try

Saturday, October 3, 2015
by Peter Ingle
IMAGINE there’s no adverts… it’s easy if you try

ONLINE ADVERTISING has become so rampant that we take it for granted. It has reached a point where we barely distinguish between our economic and our personal lives. Throw in all the real and imagined security factors that now abound, and it’s a mess. Of course, rampant advertising is one thing. But intrusive, disruptive, in-your-face,... Read »

The Mystery of Creation in the Arts

Sunday, February 8, 2015
by Peter Ingle
The Mystery of Creation in the Arts

WHEN LISTENING to a beautiful piece of music, it is not easy to realize that the sound of each note emerges from utter stillness and silence—from an immaculate void that houses and then gives birth to the creation of sound. It is also not easy, after being richly satisfied by listening, to realize that... Read »

A Local Perspective on Dance

Friday, May 23, 2014
by Eliza Ingle
A Local Perspective on Dance

THERE IS A BUZZ IN THE AIR as Spoleto opens and you can feel an energy shift in people’s schedules as the cultural landscape opens up to new work and ideas. There are other faces on the streets that look different from the usual tourists because they are instead opera singers, costume designers, and choreographers—the... Read »

an Introduction to the Fourth Way

Sunday, April 6, 2014
by Peter Ingle
an Introduction to the Fourth Way

The excerpt below is from The Little Book of Transforming Negative Emotions now on iBooks and Kindle. It explains the larger context in which work on negative emotions is meant to occur. copyright © 2014 • Peter Ingle • All Rights Reserved THE FOURTH WAY is a psychological system for the development of consciousness that is said to have existed... Read »

Swami Abhedananda

Sunday, April 6, 2014
by Peter Ingle
Swami Abhedananda

Swami Abhedananda (1866-1939) was an Indian mystic. Among his writings was The Philosophy of Work, from which the selections in The Heart of Awareness were taken. He was very much influenced by the Bhagavad-Gita, raja yoga, meditation, and Ramakrishna. If we study our own souls carefully, we find that our mind, intellect, senses, and body are within... Read »

I AM

Monday, March 31, 2014
by Peter Ingle
I AM

I AM is one of the books that served as material for The Heart of Awareness. Jean Klein was a French physician and musicologist who became a devout student and then teacher of Advaita, although he typically used simple language from his own experience in place of standard Advaita terminology. After living and studying... Read »

Books about Awareness

Monday, March 31, 2014
by Peter Ingle
Books about Awareness

This eBook includes selections about conscious awareness from the masters Huang Po, Swami Abhedananda, Ramana Maharshi, H.W.L Poonja, Nisargadatta, and Jean Klein. Buy it at Apple iBooks Buy it on Kindle blank text blank text blank text blank text blank text blank text blank text This eBook is a selection of observations by the author about awareness as the... Read »

The Nature of Money and Self

Wednesday, November 20, 2013
by ChasToday
The Nature of Money and Self

This is a startlingly insightful book about money, our relationship to money, and how money affects our relationship to our selves and with each other. Charles Einstein is the author of Sacred Economics, which traces the history of money from ancient gift economies to modern capitalism, revealing how the money system has contributed to... Read »

Land of the Free? Home of the Brave?

Sunday, October 20, 2013
by Goodie Nuff
Land of the Free? Home of the Brave?

MY DEAR HATTIE likes to fasten onto a problem, go on a rant, and steam like a kettle even though she knows it won’t do much good. Nothing seems to change much just by complaining, does it? Sure, sometimes anger pricks our conscience. Makes us stand up and look a situation more square in... Read »

Those That Crave Candy: Hansel and Gretel Retold

Thursday, February 21, 2013
by USL Writer
Those That Crave Candy: Hansel and Gretel Retold

Those That Crave Candy: Hansel and Gretel Retold (Gold Key in Humor) Sophie Bello, 8th grade I guess I should feel sorry for those kids after hearing their sob story, but I don’t. At all. The way they treated me was awful, and what did I do to them? Provide shelter and mugs of... Read »

Il Giardino (The Garden)

Thursday, February 21, 2013
by ChasToday
Il Giardino (The Garden)

Il Giardino (The Garden) (Silver Key in Short Story) Sophie Bello, 8th grade My name means ‘little fire’ in Italian, and I sure lived up to it. Even more now after mom left dad. I have quite the temper, and how my parents knew I would is a mystery, but they sure named me... Read »

Hailey the Unicorn Huntress

Thursday, February 21, 2013
by USL Writer
Hailey the Unicorn Huntress

Hailey the Unicorn Huntress (Gold Key in Humor) Sophie Bello, 8th grade My heart was beating in quick patterns as I began to run. The horse was dead ahead; oblivious of what it would soon become. I pulled the sharp horn off my tool belt and lunged into the air. The white stallion looked... Read »

Goodbye Ankles, Hello Socks

Thursday, February 21, 2013
by USL Writer
Goodbye Ankles, Hello Socks

Goodbye Ankles, Hello Socks (Honorable mention in flash fiction) Sophie Bello, 8th grade “What?” My eyes were wide with shock as I turned to the hunched over old man. “I have to climb up that mountain?” I miserably looked up at the perilously steep trail, leading to the treasure. The man, formally known as... Read »

The Shop

Friday, February 1, 2013
by USL Writer
The Shop

The Shop by Jeanne Marie Martin, 8th grade IT WAS RAINING the day I first went into the shop, the little shop on Hickery Lane. It was small and rather cramped with the smell of must and dust, but it is my safe-house from the terrors outside. It was September 11, 2001. My dad... Read »

The Darkness of a Banana

Wednesday, January 16, 2013
by USL Writer
The Darkness of a Banana

The Darkness of a Banana by Annabella Leone (7th grade) A BANANA. SUCH A SIMPLE THING. Yet when combined with the darkness of a million nights, and the evil of a twisted soul, it is no longer the sweet delicacy of which certain breads and pies are made. The foul fruit is more wicked... Read »

An Interview About CharlestonToday.net

Wednesday, April 25, 2012
by ChasToday

Peter Ingle talks with host Ron Small on WTMA’s Morning Buzz Show, April 25, 2012 Thanks to Producer John Quincy for this podcast recording »

Local 8th Grader Pens Award-winning Short Story

Tuesday, April 24, 2012
by ChasToday

Tracked by Sarah Hand Sarah Hand is an eighth grader at University School of the Lowcountry in Mount Pleasant. This year (2012) her story “Tracked” won a regional gold key award which enabled her to enter national competition where she was awarded the silver medal in the scholastic arts and writing for short story.... Read »

Cunningham’s Last Stand

Thursday, December 29, 2011
by Eliza Ingle
Cunningham’s Last Stand

A FEW WEEKS AGO I made a pilgrimage to the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) to see the second to last performance of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Like me, many of you might think traveling to Brooklyn is on the same adventure level as traveling to Tasmania, but it can be easily reached... Read »

Perils of the Prom Dress

Tuesday, April 19, 2011
by Eliza Ingle
Perils of the Prom Dress

RECENTLY IN WASHINGTON, D.C., I encountered the city in its cherry-blossom beauty when Spring peeks under the cold hand of Winter and the city can bask again in its glory. I am always reminded that the style of this city is a perfect blend of aesthetics and ethics which was never protected from the... Read »

Collaborations: A Dance Concert

Friday, April 8, 2011
by ChasToday
Collaborations: A Dance Concert

Submitted to the Creative Writing Corner by Gabrielle Schecker BACK IN MARCH, I attended the College of Charleston Department of Theatre’s annual dance concert, Collaborations. At first, I couldn’t make a connection between the title and the program. When the lights dimmed and the curtains opened, I concentrated on the dancers, the songs, the... Read »

The Spell of Spring

Friday, April 8, 2011
by Eliza Ingle
The Spell of Spring

I FELT SPRING TODAY. Though it is a delayed reaction to the official calendar, I think there is an internal calendar which we can feel as the shift of a new season begins and our spring self emerges out of the our winter self with a certain lightness of being. Our eyes lift from... Read »

Performance Ponderings—what to do?

Thursday, March 17, 2011
by William Furtwangler
Performance Ponderings—what to do?

On Standing Ovations SHOULD YOU STAND during a concluding ovation for a performance? It depends on whether you think it is worthy of such an accolade. What happens often in Charleston is that a few audience members stand, then a few more, then a few more, then maybe almost all the audience stands. It... Read »

Billy Collins Was Here

Monday, January 24, 2011
by Eliza Ingle
Billy Collins Was Here

TO CLIMB the stairs of the Charleston Library Society’s historic building on King Street under a full moon on a cold January evening to hear Billy Collins read his poetry for members of the Poetry Society of South Carolina Society was a winter highlight. Although this exclusive event was offered only to the Poetry Society (whose... Read »

Unsettling Beauty

Sunday, January 16, 2011
by Peter Ingle
Unsettling Beauty

THE FIRST THING that strikes you is the majesty, the serenity, the colors. Then you understand what you’re looking at, and it becomes heart-wrenching. An exhibit poster at the Gibbes Museum of Art says it best: “At first glance the brilliantly colored, impasto-like patterns that J. Henry Fair captures with his camera... Read »

N.Y. City At Christmas

Wednesday, December 15, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
N.Y. City At Christmas

THERE IS NOTHING more festive than New York City adorned in its Christmas splendor. The department store windows on Fifth Avenue never cease to boost the heart and soul of anyone who sees them, and always at the top of the delights stands the tree at Rockefeller Plaza which, no matter your age, prompts... Read »

Give in to Thanks

Wednesday, November 24, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
Give in to Thanks

IN THE SPIRIT of holiday travel minus the inappropriate pat downs, I took a solo, 1000-mile journey to Washington D.C. and back. The purpose of the trip was twofold: to retrieve my daughter from boarding school for her first return home since September; and to check on my father who recently endured a stroke... Read »

The North and South of It

Friday, October 1, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
The North and South of It

ONE OF MY earliest ‘movement memories’ (dancers think about these things) is swinging on an old tree swing and enjoying the feeling of being neither here nor there. Moving forward, there was the immediate pull backwards; and then came the momentum and rush of going forward again. Born in the North from a Southern... Read »

Choreography for Dance and Life

Thursday, September 16, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
Choreography for Dance and Life

TWICE A WEEK I meet to teach the art of choreography to a small group of mature, interested (for now), and interesting students. For me, a self-professed dance geek, being able to watch and analyze dance while searching for meaning and breaking down the craft with college students is one of the great pleasures... Read »

The Art of Summer

Thursday, July 22, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
The Art of Summer

IT IS SUMMER when we allow ourselves to slow down and reflect on our personal map with the ‘You Are Here’ designation. There is a slight promise of fall, but it is the open window of time where we can meditate on the here and now. We can see more clearly through our magnifying... Read »

Turning Movement into Words

Tuesday, June 22, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
Turning Movement into Words

RECENTLY I have been writing about dance more than actively dancing, and since this blog is a platform on which to bounce my opinion to the small readership I have, I thought to take the first long day of summer to do so. This was the first Spoleto where my fellow dancers in Anonymity... Read »

Observing Art… With Kids!

Tuesday, April 6, 2010
by Eliza Ingle
Observing Art… With Kids!

ON A RECENT TRIP to the Big Apple with my eleven- and seven-year-olds, I was faced with the realization that viewing art with children is never as satisfying as you dream it will be. Something like, “the best laid plans go to waste” came to mind. I’m not saying the experience was not beneficial... Read »

Educating the Heart

Saturday, October 10, 2009
by Eliza Ingle
Educating the Heart

THERE ARE MANY jewels in our fair city, but one of the lesser known ones is the Sophia Institute which offers a variety of opportunities for exploring things of a spiritual nature through lectures and retreats that help people understand and appreciate the world—ancient and new—around them. Frankly, it took me a while to... Read »

The First Pad 39

Friday, September 25, 2009
by Agricola
The First Pad 39

LOOKING AT THE BEHEMOTH, poised in its techno-mechanical superiority as it waits to slip the surly bonds, ready to cheat death one more time (we hope), I cannot help but think of the first Pad 39. It was located behind a house on Murray Boulevard where a group of young teenagers were ‘given’ a... Read »

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